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June 16, 2017
Book Review by Rosemary Tayler Published in 2007, the 155-page book, Sacred Stewardship: Regaining our spiritual partnership with the food we eat, by Charles Hubbard and Malki'el McCamis, presents a balanced approach to biodynamic farming.
February 7, 2017
Book Review by Rosemary Tayler Have you ever taken the time to notice how the leaves on a plant change shape from one leaf to the next as they appear on the stem and then transform higher up the stock into a flower and then later into fruit?
January 15, 2017
by Rosemary Tayler In my opinion, Jeremy Naydler has done a fantastic job compiling this well-organized, timeless classic of scientific writings by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe(1749-1832). At the outset, Naydler sets his intention by dedicating

What does “organic” mean? 

Simply stated, organic produce and other ingredients are grown without the use of pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, genetically modified organisms, or ionizing radiation. Animals that produce meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products do not take antibiotics or growth hormones. 

The USDA National Organic Program (NOP) defines organic as follows:

Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too.

**Note that Canadian organic standards follow the USDA model.

Here are a number of organic certification labels that you may recognize: